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2 edition of production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities found in the catalog.

production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities

C. S. Parkin

production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities

by C. S. Parkin

  • 329 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis(Ph.D.) - Loughborough University of Technology 1973.

Statementby C.S. Parkin.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19602848M

Other approaches make use of electrohydrodynamic jett which involves a tube with a meniscus bearing a Taylor cone profile spraying a fine jet. On-demand droplets with sizes much smaller Cited by:   The effect of compressibility of fluids on the linear electrohydrodynamic instability of a dielectric liquid sheet issued from a nozzle into an ambient dielectric stationary gas in the presence The production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities. Ph. D. Thesis, Loughborough University of Cited by:

Electrostatic charging and deflection of nonconventional droplet streams formed from capillary stream breakup Physics of Flu ( This paper concerns the electrostatic charging of droplets generated with a-m disturbances, “ The generation of capillary instabilities on a liquid jet Cited by:   During the jet break-up, two consecutive liquid blobs may coalesce and form a bigger emitted droplet, probably due to the jet acceleration. The size of droplets exceeds Rayleigh’s prediction owing to the stabilizing effect of both the axial electric field and viscosity.

An experimental study has been performed on the structure of an electrostatic spray of monodisperse droplets. Such a spray is established when a liquid with sufficient electric conductivity and moderate surface tension, in the present case heptane doped with an antistatic additive, is fed through a small metal tube maintained at several kilovolts relative to a ground electrode a few Cited by: It was found that droplets are ejected from the jet at a relatively high velocity in a region characterized by a very intense electric field. They maintain this velocity farther downstream because of inertia, even though the field is precipitously decreasing, and ultimately decelerate under the action of the drag force and a progressively weaker electrostatic by:


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Production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities by C. S. Parkin Download PDF EPUB FB2

The production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities The production of droplets from jets formed directly at nozzles was used in the lead shot production process where a nozzle was placed in the base of a tank of molten by: 2.

The production of droplets from liquid jets by capillary and electrohydrodynamic instabilities Author: Parkin, Charles by: 2. Capillary instability of liquid jets Curvature Elongational rheology Free liquid jets Linear stability theory Nonlinear theory Quasi-one-dimensional equations Reynolds number Rheologically complex liquids (pseudoplastic, dilatant, and viscoelastic polymeric liquids) Satellite drops Small perturbations Spatial instability Surface tension Swirl Temporal instability Thermocapillarity by: A liquid jet resulting from the laminar rotary spraying of an oil-in-water emulsion (O/W) with a zero shear viscosity of 60 mPa s and a surface tension on the order 40 mN/m has been studied by.

a capillary jet and the formation of droplets from the jet by use of the electromagnetic force are carried out. Gallium is used as a liquid metal because it is very easy to handle due to the low melting point. Then, the breakup of the capillary jet is calculated by a numerical simulation, whichFile Size: 6MB.

Generation of monodisperse droplets to 4 μm in diameter from electrified cone-jets of highly conducting and viscous liquids. Journal of Aerosol Science, Vol. 25, Issue. 6, p. Cited by: Electrostatic spraying from a capillary is investigated in the case in which the droplets are formed by the breakup of a permanent jet extending from a volume of liquid in conical : Chuan-Hua Chen.

The critical thread length before jetting droplets and the critical length of a viscous tail before breakup in dripping are also examined. This study classifies and defines regimes of thread instabilities that can be used to produce supra- and subchannel size viscous droplets in an elementary microfluidic by: A liquid jet, starting as a laminar flow of liquid emerging from a circular nozzle into air, forms a cylindrical column of liquid.

Due to capillary effects this liquid column is unstable and breaks down into short sections, creating droplets. This behaviour of jets has been the subject of many studies. A liquid jet issued from an elliptical orifice exhibits oscillation, which is known as axis switching.

The major and minor axes of the jet's cross section interchange alternately [1][2] [3]. The. field is applied to liquid exiting a capillary, it deforms into a conic structure called a Taylor cone [1]. In typical prac-tice, the tip of this cone extends to form a liquid microjet (cone-jet mode), and charged droplets are ejected from the end of the microjet [2].

Among other applications, electrospray ionization has become a workhorse in. Sato, M. The production of essentially uniform-sized liquid droplets in gaseous or immiscible liquid media under applied A.C.

potential. Electrostat. 15 (2), – Cited by:   STABILITY AND ATOMIZATION CHARACTERISTICS OF ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC JETS IN THE CONE-JET AND MULTI-JET MODES. Journal of Aerosol Science, Vol. 31, Issue. 10, p. but eventually breaks up into fine droplets, a fact utilized in electro-spraying devices.

Lord On the instability of a cylinder of viscous liquid under capillary by: The approximation governs both long wavelength axisymmetric distortions of the jet, as well as long wavelength oscillations of the centerline of the jet.

Three different instabilities are. The phenomenology of the instability of charged and uncharged drops and liquid menisci at the end of a capillary through which liquid is fed in constant and variable external electric fields, both uniform and nonuniform, is considered.

Methods of investigating such instability are by: As a result of jet impingement and penetration into the oil, the melt jet disintegrates into micro-sized droplets and ligaments by a combination of the natural jet breakup phenomenon and EHD.

Stability of electrohydrodynamic flows is essential to a variety of applications ranging from electrokinetic assays to electro-spray ionization.

In this series of lecture notes, a few basic concepts of electrohydrodynamic stability are illustrated using two model problems, electrokinetic mixing flow and electrohydrodynamic cone-jet. In electrohydrodynamic ink-jet printers, an electric field is used to eject sub-femtoliter drops from very fine glass capillaries [15,16].

While thermal and piezoelectric printers use acoustic energy to destabilize the fluid contained in a nozzle, electrohydrodynamic-jet (e-jet. The free end of the jet undergoes electrohydrodynamic instabilities of one of two types: varicose or kink (Cloupeau and Prunet-Foch,Cloupeau and Prunet-Foch, ).

The produced droplets are of nearly monodisperse size. In the case of dripping and microdripping modes the droplets Cited by: 1. In our experiment, a cylindrical liquid jet was injected into the air from a stainless steel needle of inner diameter mm, as sketched in Fig.

1(a).The cylindrical coordinate system (r, θ, z) is utilized to describe the problem, where r, θ, and z are the radial, azimuthal, and axial coordinates, needle was connected to a high-voltage dc electric source to charge the jet. In the ambient air, the continuous production of droplets by the EHD process is generally observed by applying a potential difference of several thousand volts between a plate and the end of a capillary supplied with liquid.

The droplets emitted are charged. They may be neutralized if necessary by different methods (Cloupeau, ).Cited by: Abstract—ElectroHydroDynamic Atomization (EHDA) is a physical process of liquid dispersion to fine droplets by electrical force and shear stress on the liquid surface.

Under these forces, the jet at a capillary nozzle outlet elongates and breaks up into fine droplets at its end. The production of droplets by the collision of two liquid jets, referred to as impinging jet atomization, has seen diverse industrial use (Ashgriz, ).

Although many researchers have examined its use in bipropellant rocket engines, it is in fact the droplet production mechanism used in the Respimat® device for inhaled pharmaceutical aerosol.